Moving to a new location

This blog is not defunct, new blog posts will be posted to another destination. The pending tasks for migration require some hours of effort that I cannot spare at this time.

Hopefully, after Diwali, readers will be able to read about product management in India on the new website.

Hat tip to Cranky Product Manager, I will continue posting new items under my own name, on the new site.

No longer on Quora

A while back, Quora flagged my account as using a pseudonym and not a real name. Apart from flagging it, they suspended my account.

The process to get it reactivated seemed cumbersome, unnecessary and intrusive. I use this moniker in various other places which have not had a problem with it so far. And while social media is useful, the privacy issues have not been satisfactorily addressed so far(in my opinion).

Net result, I decided to delete my Quora account.

At some point, the processes and rules to manage a cloud service must co-exist with the rights of individual users. To flag a long term user as a violator of “Terms of Service” could be interpreted in various ways.

I still get email traffic from the blog asking for my opinion on various topics, and I plan to continue responding to these emails.

Changed Work Circumstances

Don’t have time for regular updates, will try to post more on this in a few weeks.
You can reach me on the gmail id on the about page if required.

Share Your Story

If you have interviewed for, or worked as a product manager in the technology industry in India, and would like to use this blog to share your stories or experiences, drop me a mail. I will be happy to include guest posts on this blog, if these posts are related to recruitment/interviews/compensation, workplace stories or challenges faced or another relevant topic.

You can also follow me on twitter @desiprodmgr and tweet your interest in guest posts there.

Product Manager Or Business Analyst

[In a previous post, I had mentioned the overlap between the role of a product manager and a business analyst]

Here’s a scenario, you have several years of engineering experience under your belt. You have also managed to get a part-time MBA during your career. And now your organization has moved you from engineering/dev-ops/tech. support to product management. Here is another scenario, you have been working as a business analyst in an IT services firm, and have worked for a few product development clients. And now a client in that domain has offered you a product management role.

Is it time to celebrate this awesome product management opportunity?

Well…read further. The following job features may indicate that you end up working as a business analyst.

Reporting to Another Product Manager

No brainer, if your reporting is not to senior management, in India or overseas, then only a part of the product management function is delegated to you. This aspect brings the role closer to a functional business analyst role.

Limited/No Engagement with Product Marketing

If your only engagement with product marketing is at an all-hands meeting or a town hall, then you are not engaged in any outbound product management activities. This also tilts your role towards business analysis rather than strategic product management.

No Involvement in 2-3 of the 4 P’s of Marketing

You can figure out if this is relevant to your role, and whether you are able to work on these as a product manager or a business analyst.

Engineering is your Primary (or Only) Stakeholder

If you are working as a product owner, with limited product management tasks, then that is fine. You have a well-defined role which fits into the product management hierarchy, in today’s agile world. But if you are called a product manager, and your reporting is to a Director of Engineering, and your primary stakeholders are the engineering team, then you might be working as a functional business analyst.

Your Main Work Output is a Functional Specifications Document

This is typically true in e-commerce firms or start-ups. Most product managers in such firms are actually working as business analysts, creating functional specifications, providing reports on product usability and usage. And product decisions are usually made by the senior management of these firms. Business analysts handle such activities in most enterprise software firms.

Limited Engagement with Senior Management in Business Units

Product managers play a strategic role in addition to taking care of tactical activities. If you have never presented on strategy, finance, operations, pricing, marketing plan, new product business case or another business metric to senior management, then you may be working as a business analyst.

 Note:

There is nothing wrong with the role of a business analyst. BA’s have a lot more exposure to the product and business domain than a regular product developer. The current challenge in India lies in the fact that firms require BAs and advertise for PMs, which sometimes leads  to an expectation-reality mismatch.

True Story – “We Intend to Hire”

A well-known e-commerce/internet firm based in North India contacted an ex-colleague in the last quarter of 2014. He works as a product manager in an offshore setup, is very well versed in technology and business management and is originally from North India.

The recruiter first asked if he is willing to move to the NCR region. My friend said that for family reasons he is only looking at opportunities in Bangalore. The recruiter then said that they are establishing an engineering center in Bangalore and that he would only be interviewed for roles in Bangalore. The recruiter asked for his résumé, salary, current designation and a brief description of his current responsibilities. In addition, he was asked about the expected salary, and he said, “It’s negotiable, depending on the package, but I am expecting a 20% hike in salary”. After providing these details, my pal asked them about the role and the next steps in the process. The recruiter mentioned “someone will get back to you” and that was the end of the discussion.

Three months later, in January, a well-known head-hunting firm reached out to him for a role in the same e-commerce firm. When asked about expected salary, he gave the same answer as before. After providing all details, he asked if the role was for NCR or Bangalore. The head-hunter replied that they are actively recruiting product managers for Bangalore and he would only be interviewed for Bangalore. After this call, nothing further happened in the process.

Last week, another recruiter from the same e-commerce firm called him after viewing his profile on LinkedIn. This time, my pal said that he is willing to relocate to NCR if required, although he prefers Bangalore. The recruiter then said that we only have product management positions in NCR at this time but “we intend to recruit” product managers for Bangalore in future. He also said that the Bangalore center is yet to take off. After hearing this, he decided to look elsewhere for a job.

Lesson learnt!

[To avoid such situations you must try to identify the hiring manager at the earliest]

Product Manager Recruitment in India is in Trouble

Some issues which I came across, and have posted about before:

  • Candidates barely get to speak to hiring managers during the recruitment process. A colleague mentioned how he was interviewed by a solution architect and the HR manager for a PM role in an IT services firm.
  • You are likely to find a “young inexperienced star” running the product function in many startups today, who then looks for senior, experienced folks to report to him.
  • Hiring managers in most startups are unable to understand the job needs and make generic job specification (very common across e-commerce websites).
  • Resumes are so filled with jargon that they give no sign of a candidates skills, capabilities or achievements.
  • 90-95% of applications on job portals may not be viewed by a human.
  • PM training is reduced to a few certifications or some short term courses.
  • Promoting from within (along with limited PM training) is reducing the firm’s ability to actually deliver great products.
  • Recruitment teams are not able to filter good candidates, which is why candidates should start networking with anyone at the firm who can promote their application.
  • Many business analysts or solution architects are positioning themselves as product managers, without having the necessary skills to do a good job.

More to follow