“Are You Really A Product Manager?”

Background

Over the years, I have faced many product management interviews with all sorts of firms. A few of these have been with entrepreneurs in India who have launched multiple businesses and have been the CEO of their own firm for more than 10 years. In my experience they are some of the shrewdest people I have interviewed with, and they have a really good grasp of what skills and talent they need in a candidate.

The Incident

This happened during a discussion with a CEO in 2012, who runs an enterprise software firm with clients in the US, EU and APAC regions. The job advertised was for an enterprise software product manager.

As is usual, the interview start with the standard “tell me about yourself”. I gave a summary of my career so far, with details about my work in different roles and the related tasks and initiatives. During my description, I could see him adopting a quizzical look. So once I finished my narrative, I waited for him to take the lead and ask some questions about my background. I was taken aback when he said (paraphrasing here), “the work you have done sounds wonderful, but are you really a product manager?”

headscratcherI was flummoxed, and did not understand why he asked this. I have worked in product management with 2 large enterprise software firms, and that is the relevant part of my work life which I had described to him in the past few minutes. I asked him to explain what he meant, and he said that while the work of building products is important, what is also important is the amount of time spent with sales, pre-sales, account management, clients, prospects, marketing and all outward facing teams. And this is what I had glossed over (according to him).

Now the reason I did that is because the role advertised was for an inbound product manager, and there is little to connect what he wanted to hear and what I was to be hired for. I explained to him that I have done every product management task in my earlier roles (including the rarity in India, product pricing) and since he has a vacancy in an inbound role, that is what I spoke about.

He clarified that hee was really not interested in what I had to contribute on product design and engineering, and his main concern was “Can you manage the pricing, packaging and promotion of the product successfully?”. He wanted someone who could work with anyone in his organization, to get the product “out of the door”. In his mind, those are the traditional success metrics in any product management role. And that is what he wanted to hear about. Needless to say, I did not see a way to bridge this expectation gap, and did not get the job.

Traditionally, this is how senior management uses product managers, especially for enterprise products, and if you only have offshore product management experience you will probably never fit into one of these India headquartered organizations. So unless you have exposure to outbound activities as well, you will remain a one-dimensional product manager, with little possibility of getting a job in an India based startup. This career shift is important, as it is the a surefire way to get a leadership role in the technology industry.

So think about your own career, and ask yourself, “Are you really a product manager?“.

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