Category Archives: Learning and Growing

Share Your Story

If you have interviewed for, or worked as a product manager in the technology industry in India, and would like to use this blog to share your stories or experiences, drop me a mail. I will be happy to include guest posts on this blog, if these posts are related to recruitment/interviews/compensation, workplace stories or challenges faced or another relevant topic.

You can also follow me on twitter @desiprodmgr and tweet your interest in guest posts there.

Product Manager Or Business Analyst

[In a previous post, I had mentioned the overlap between the role of a product manager and a business analyst]

Here’s a scenario, you have several years of engineering experience under your belt. You have also managed to get a part-time MBA during your career. And now your organization has moved you from engineering/dev-ops/tech. support to product management. Here is another scenario, you have been working as a business analyst in an IT services firm, and have worked for a few product development clients. And now a client in that domain has offered you a product management role.

Is it time to celebrate this awesome product management opportunity?

Well…read further. The following job features may indicate that you end up working as a business analyst.

Reporting to Another Product Manager

No brainer, if your reporting is not to senior management, in India or overseas, then only a part of the product management function is delegated to you. This aspect brings the role closer to a functional business analyst role.

Limited/No Engagement with Product Marketing

If your only engagement with product marketing is at an all-hands meeting or a town hall, then you are not engaged in any outbound product management activities. This also tilts your role towards business analysis rather than strategic product management.

No Involvement in 2-3 of the 4 P’s of Marketing

You can figure out if this is relevant to your role, and whether you are able to work on these as a product manager or a business analyst.

Engineering is your Primary (or Only) Stakeholder

If you are working as a product owner, with limited product management tasks, then that is fine. You have a well-defined role which fits into the product management hierarchy, in today’s agile world. But if you are called a product manager, and your reporting is to a Director of Engineering, and your primary stakeholders are the engineering team, then you might be working as a functional business analyst.

Your Main Work Output is a Functional Specifications Document

This is typically true in e-commerce firms or start-ups. Most product managers in such firms are actually working as business analysts, creating functional specifications, providing reports on product usability and usage. And product decisions are usually made by the senior management of these firms. Business analysts handle such activities in most enterprise software firms.

Limited Engagement with Senior Management in Business Units

Product managers play a strategic role in addition to taking care of tactical activities. If you have never presented on strategy, finance, operations, pricing, marketing plan, new product business case or another business metric to senior management, then you may be working as a business analyst.

 Note:

There is nothing wrong with the role of a business analyst. BA’s have a lot more exposure to the product and business domain than a regular product developer. The current challenge in India lies in the fact that firms require BAs and advertise for PMs, which sometimes leads  to an expectation-reality mismatch.

Time To Get Agile/Scrum Certified

In earlier posts, I have written about the challenges of agile product management. I also reviewed a pretty good book “Agile Product Management with Scrum” that you should read to learn about Agile software development and the Product Owner/Manager’s role.

Well, now it may be time to go one step ahead and become a Certified Scrum Product Owner (CSPO).

This certification is a basic two-day introduction to gathering requirements and delivering them to the scrum team in the format of user stories. After getting certified, you will also get access to the online forums, blogs and other resources that you can use to hone your story-writing skills. One advertised benefit is the ability to show potential employers your knowledge of Scrum. There are some other certifications associated with Agile development (Scrum Master, Scrum Developer, Scrum Coach etc.) which are of limited use in a Product Owner role. You can find more information on these with a simple Google search.

Alternatively, you can go for the PMI Agile Certified Practitioner (PMI-ACP)® certification. This looks like a rigorous training with a lot of pre-qualifications before you apply for the certification. However, if you are already PMP certified, then it may be easier to get this certification. Personally, I am not in favor of product managers going for a PMP certification, for the simple reason that product managers have a different role that project managers.

If you are an old-timer in the industry, you might remember how Rational OOAD and UML was a pretty big thing at one time. And to get business analyst roles, you had to be well versed in those tools. Now with teams going agile, these certifications may give you the edge, when you are out there, looking for a product manager/product owner role.

Do understand your own career aspirations, the costs associated with these courses and then make an informed decision on either of these certifications.

Product Management Merry Go Round!

Musical ChairsSeveral years ago, when engineering hiring in dot-coms was peaking, you could see the same resumes making the rounds in top firms (Microsoft, Google, Ebay, Amazon and others) in India’s Silicon Valley.

Some years back, there was a great article in Forbes India that mentioned how the Top Honchos of Tech. MNCs in India keep rotating between the same firms, which led to limited value addition to these firms.

Now it seems product managers resumes are making the rounds in the same way. Many recruiters with such firms are pinging folks on LinkedIn with product manager designations, to fill vacancies in their organizations.

Here’s a true story of what happened with me.

A few months ago, I got a mail from a recruiter at a well-funded startup, offering a product management role. The profile was interesting, with a mix of product design and analytics for a cloud based offering, but it was an entry-level role so I replied back declining the offer to interview with them.

The next day, I got another email, which had the email ids of about 20 product managers from Amazon, Myntra, Ebay, Infoedge, Intuit, Microsoft, Walmart Labs, Flipkart etc. (My guess is that the recruiter wanted to bcc all of us, but messed up).

It said that the recruiter was happy to have made contact with us, and wanted us to refer folks from our companies if we were not directly interested in working in that product management role. Being curious, I looked at the profile for these folks copied on the mail with me. It became clear that most of these folks had:

1) B. Tech. or MBA from a Top College (IIT/NIT/ISB/IIM)

2) Worked in at least 2-3 different product management roles before their current one

3) Rotated between an MNC and a startup in their career, or between different MNCs

4) done at least one stint in a client facing role (marketing/sales/business development) or worked in the US

My guess is that many offshore MNC with a product manager opening will ping these same folks for the PM role (unless internal candidates are available). This may also indicate why many folks are unable to get a PM role in India, if they have not done it before. Finally, my guess is that these firms are also compensating PMs at similar levels which makes hiring easier.

The merits of this hiring strategy are debatable, but let’s leave that for another post.

Ask Me Anything – Within Reason

It is always great to hear from people who read this blog and have responded over email or comments. Sometimes you use real identities, other times it’s an alias. I am fine with both. If your questions are interesting or relevant, I will try to respond back quickly.

However, if possible, kindly provide some context before asking for for my opinion on questions such as:

  • How do I get more competitive compensation? (You need to share what you earn now and how you got there)
  • How do I get into product management? (What do you do today and what is your educational background)
  • How do I crack product management interviews? (There are hundreds of resources out there on this topic)
  • How do I grow in my career? (You need to provide your career and current job details)
  • I want to return from US and into a product management role in an offshore setup ( This is a mix of #2 and #4)

I try to answer most questions, but without details, you may not get a good response.

All the best in your career, and I look forward to answering more such questions.

(And no, I am not looking to connect on LinkedIn with readers from this blog)

Book Review – Stealing the Corner Office

Had been busy for a while, but have managed to read a book in the downtime. The book is titled “Stealing the Corner Office“. I have posted a brief review in the resources section. It’s a little expensive to buy in India, but the lessons it imparts about the workplace are invaluable. In case you are a corporate citizen with access to an online library, do read this book. If you are building your own collection of useful books, then you must buy this one.

Kaggle for Analytics Competitions – Feedback?

Kaggle is a platform for data prediction competitions. As per their wikipedia entry “This crowdsourcing approach relies on the fact that there are countless strategies that can be applied to any predictive modelling task and it is impossible to know at the outset which technique or analyst will be most effective.”

I reviewed a few competitions on Kaggle, and they seem fairly complex and perhaps a good fit for advanced statisticians or data modelers. However, Kaggle is fairly popular and gets a decent amount of traffic for niche site.

  1. Does anyone have feedback on their personal experiences using Kaggle?
  2. Have you ever recruited or solicited candidates from Kaggle, for analytics roles in offshore development centers or for offshore analytics practices of IT/Analytics firms?
  3. Have you ever used it for networking?

Drop a comment on this post if you have tried any of the three.