Category Archives: Recruitment

Product Manager Or Business Analyst

[In a previous post, I had mentioned the overlap between the role of a product manager and a business analyst]

Here’s a scenario, you have several years of engineering experience under your belt. You have also managed to get a part-time MBA during your career. And now your organization has moved you from engineering/dev-ops/tech. support to product management. Here is another scenario, you have been working as a business analyst in an IT services firm, and have worked for a few product development clients. And now a client in that domain has offered you a product management role.

Is it time to celebrate this awesome product management opportunity?

Well…read further. The following job features may indicate that you end up working as a business analyst.

Reporting to Another Product Manager

No brainer, if your reporting is not to senior management, in India or overseas, then only a part of the product management function is delegated to you. This aspect brings the role closer to a functional business analyst role.

Limited/No Engagement with Product Marketing

If your only engagement with product marketing is at an all-hands meeting or a town hall, then you are not engaged in any outbound product management activities. This also tilts your role towards business analysis rather than strategic product management.

No Involvement in 2-3 of the 4 P’s of Marketing

You can figure out if this is relevant to your role, and whether you are able to work on these as a product manager or a business analyst.

Engineering is your Primary (or Only) Stakeholder

If you are working as a product owner, with limited product management tasks, then that is fine. You have a well-defined role which fits into the product management hierarchy, in today’s agile world. But if you are called a product manager, and your reporting is to a Director of Engineering, and your primary stakeholders are the engineering team, then you might be working as a functional business analyst.

Your Main Work Output is a Functional Specifications Document

This is typically true in e-commerce firms or start-ups. Most product managers in such firms are actually working as business analysts, creating functional specifications, providing reports on product usability and usage. And product decisions are usually made by the senior management of these firms. Business analysts handle such activities in most enterprise software firms.

Limited Engagement with Senior Management in Business Units

Product managers play a strategic role in addition to taking care of tactical activities. If you have never presented on strategy, finance, operations, pricing, marketing plan, new product business case or another business metric to senior management, then you may be working as a business analyst.

 Note:

There is nothing wrong with the role of a business analyst. BA’s have a lot more exposure to the product and business domain than a regular product developer. The current challenge in India lies in the fact that firms require BAs and advertise for PMs, which sometimes leads  to an expectation-reality mismatch.

Advertisements

True Story – “We Intend to Hire”

A well-known e-commerce/internet firm based in North India contacted an ex-colleague in the last quarter of 2014. He works as a product manager in an offshore setup, is very well versed in technology and business management and is originally from North India.

The recruiter first asked if he is willing to move to the NCR region. My friend said that for family reasons he is only looking at opportunities in Bangalore. The recruiter then said that they are establishing an engineering center in Bangalore and that he would only be interviewed for roles in Bangalore. The recruiter asked for his résumé, salary, current designation and a brief description of his current responsibilities. In addition, he was asked about the expected salary, and he said, “It’s negotiable, depending on the package, but I am expecting a 20% hike in salary”. After providing these details, my pal asked them about the role and the next steps in the process. The recruiter mentioned “someone will get back to you” and that was the end of the discussion.

Three months later, in January, a well-known head-hunting firm reached out to him for a role in the same e-commerce firm. When asked about expected salary, he gave the same answer as before. After providing all details, he asked if the role was for NCR or Bangalore. The head-hunter replied that they are actively recruiting product managers for Bangalore and he would only be interviewed for Bangalore. After this call, nothing further happened in the process.

Last week, another recruiter from the same e-commerce firm called him after viewing his profile on LinkedIn. This time, my pal said that he is willing to relocate to NCR if required, although he prefers Bangalore. The recruiter then said that we only have product management positions in NCR at this time but “we intend to recruit” product managers for Bangalore in future. He also said that the Bangalore center is yet to take off. After hearing this, he decided to look elsewhere for a job.

Lesson learnt!

[To avoid such situations you must try to identify the hiring manager at the earliest]

Product Manager Recruitment in India is in Trouble

Some issues which I came across, and have posted about before:

  • Candidates barely get to speak to hiring managers during the recruitment process. A colleague mentioned how he was interviewed by a solution architect and the HR manager for a PM role in an IT services firm.
  • You are likely to find a “young inexperienced star” running the product function in many startups today, who then looks for senior, experienced folks to report to him.
  • Hiring managers in most startups are unable to understand the job needs and make generic job specification (very common across e-commerce websites).
  • Resumes are so filled with jargon that they give no sign of a candidates skills, capabilities or achievements.
  • 90-95% of applications on job portals may not be viewed by a human.
  • PM training is reduced to a few certifications or some short term courses.
  • Promoting from within (along with limited PM training) is reducing the firm’s ability to actually deliver great products.
  • Recruitment teams are not able to filter good candidates, which is why candidates should start networking with anyone at the firm who can promote their application.
  • Many business analysts or solution architects are positioning themselves as product managers, without having the necessary skills to do a good job.

More to follow

Is There A Dress Code for PMs?

I have seen multiple articles in various media about the dress code in different offices. An article in Esquire mentions a lot of options for formals, business casuals etc, and you can read it here. However, that is more applicable to the US and less for India. A quick search for the dress code at Infosys reveals this article. And this is more applicable to Indian offices. However, it is common to see engineers walk in wearing flip-flops and old jeans in top engineering R&D centers. Given these options, what is the dress code that one should follow as a product manager in India?

Based on my experience of various firms and sectors, even for product managers it varies from slippers and ratty t-shirts to spiffy formal suits. The dress code depends on

  • The type of firm’s business (enterprise software, telecom firm, dotcom, app development)
  • The nature of the product management role (customer facing, offshore center, market facing)
  • The closeness with customers/market
  • The occasion (external meeting, internal meeting, travel to an industry conference)

So how do the above impact the PM’s office attire?

Enterprise software and telecom firms are often huge organizations with many layers of hierarchy. Someone in middle management or a junior product manager is expected to dress smart. The smartness however, depends on the geography. Folks in the US will often be clean-shaven, wearing formal shirts and if there is a customer meeting, a tie or suit as well. And for day-to-day attire in India, formal shirt and trousers seem to work well. And this also works when people are meeting other groups within the company, or over video conferences. Not surprisingly, these are also the most common meetings a product manager attends in larger firms.

On the other hand, I have seldom come across an e-commerce product manager who even owns a suit. But in industry conferences, I have seen them occasionally wearing fresh jeans and polo shirts with clean-shaven faces. And engineers who switch to product management might also be seen in sandals and cargo shorts. From what I understand, this is perfectly acceptable in such firms or startups.

And there is a rare product management director who will not be seen in a t-shirt with his company’s logo. As I understand, this is them trying to look cool on Fridays.

As a product manager, there are many things to look out for, when working in India. Suitably dressing up for the workplace will enhance your presence and positively impact your abilities to influence others.

[The rule of thumb is to dress as your director or manager does. It makes life a little easier. In case they are of the opposite sex, look for other folks at their seniority level within the firm.]

Kaggle for Analytics Competitions – Feedback?

Kaggle is a platform for data prediction competitions. As per their wikipedia entry “This crowdsourcing approach relies on the fact that there are countless strategies that can be applied to any predictive modelling task and it is impossible to know at the outset which technique or analyst will be most effective.”

I reviewed a few competitions on Kaggle, and they seem fairly complex and perhaps a good fit for advanced statisticians or data modelers. However, Kaggle is fairly popular and gets a decent amount of traffic for niche site.

  1. Does anyone have feedback on their personal experiences using Kaggle?
  2. Have you ever recruited or solicited candidates from Kaggle, for analytics roles in offshore development centers or for offshore analytics practices of IT/Analytics firms?
  3. Have you ever used it for networking?

Drop a comment on this post if you have tried any of the three.

10 Reasons why “MBA preferred” appears in Product Manager recruitment ads

10. The recruitment team wants to shortlist candidates from thousands of applicants for an entry-level role, and MBA/PMP is chosen as a criterion. This is fairly common in large firms.

9. The Product Manager is actually required to have business modeling/statistical analysis or product pricing/marketing skills. This is very rarely needed in India, for both offshore roles and for Indian market facing roles.

8. The “MBA preferred” lets the recruitment team decline internal applicants who want to move out of an engineering role into product management.

7. The head of product management/hiring manager has an MBA

6. This product management role reports to the local sales head, and it is actually a category/brand management role for India/Asia-Pacific. Such roles are quite prevalent in hardware/mobile firms.

5. The role requires the product manager to work with vendors/clients/account teams etc. based in India, and a person with an MBA might have an edge in relationship building and management, as per the hiring manager.

4. The ad wants applicants with a full-time MBA from a top business school, but the recruitment team was not sure if they would actually get many applicants. This is often the case with senior level positions.

3. The PM head wants a “business oriented” product manager, even though the role is actually completely engineering facing, and requires strong domain knowledge. This often happens in offshore R&D centers, and often leads to a bad hire.

2. The “MBA preferred” can be interpreted as a code for highly paid candidates to apply for the job.

1. (My favorite) The ad was copied from a standard template and it contained the words “MBA preferred” in the original ad.

Web Recruitment Ad – 6: For A General Manager

Now this is an interesting recruitment ad on LinkedIn (job posting is removed):

Designation: General Manager-Web Publisher Products

Location: Bangalore

And here’s the interesting part, in the description of Professional Background and Experience, the ad states that “A degree in Computer Science or a related field is highly preferred”.

It is remarkable that for selecting a person in such a senior role (at least in the Indian arm of Amazon), the undergraduate major is “highly desirable”. Does this mean that a top manager without a computer science or related background is unlikely to be hired, or may not have a good career at Amazon India? And perhaps this also indicates their lack on interest in hiring MBAs in such roles.

Now this may be a typo in the ad, and I do not have the inside information on why they would insist on this, but if you add in this news report that the Yahoo CEO is looking for computer science graduates from top colleges, then things become murky.

Here are 3 things to ponder:

a) If you are a product manager in the web world and do not have a computer science background, are you likely to hit a glass ceiling?

b) How is a computer science degree correlated to success in a general management role?

c) Is this ad a self-selective ad, which indicates that IITians with a computer science background, who have been successful in their careers, are what Amazon is actually looking for among the applicant pool?

Disclaimer: I have a lot of respect for Amazon.com and the work they do in India and overseas. I was just curious about this report on Yahoo and the Amazon recruitment ad, and hence this blog post.