Tag Archives: learning product management

Moving to a new location

This blog is not defunct, new blog posts will be posted to another destination. The pending tasks for migration require some hours of effort that I cannot spare at this time.

Hopefully, after Diwali, readers will be able to read about product management in India on the new website.

Hat tip to Cranky Product Manager, I will continue posting new items under my own name, on the new site.

Share Your Story

If you have interviewed for, or worked as a product manager in the technology industry in India, and would like to use this blog to share your stories or experiences, drop me a mail. I will be happy to include guest posts on this blog, if these posts are related to recruitment/interviews/compensation, workplace stories or challenges faced or another relevant topic.

You can also follow me on twitter @desiprodmgr and tweet your interest in guest posts there.

Ask Me Anything – Within Reason

It is always great to hear from people who read this blog and have responded over email or comments. Sometimes you use real identities, other times it’s an alias. I am fine with both. If your questions are interesting or relevant, I will try to respond back quickly.

However, if possible, kindly provide some context before asking for for my opinion on questions such as:

  • How do I get more competitive compensation? (You need to share what you earn now and how you got there)
  • How do I get into product management? (What do you do today and what is your educational background)
  • How do I crack product management interviews? (There are hundreds of resources out there on this topic)
  • How do I grow in my career? (You need to provide your career and current job details)
  • I want to return from US and into a product management role in an offshore setup ( This is a mix of #2 and #4)

I try to answer most questions, but without details, you may not get a good response.

All the best in your career, and I look forward to answering more such questions.

(And no, I am not looking to connect on LinkedIn with readers from this blog)

Book Review – Stealing the Corner Office

Had been busy for a while, but have managed to read a book in the downtime. The book is titled “Stealing the Corner Office“. I have posted a brief review in the resources section. It’s a little expensive to buy in India, but the lessons it imparts about the workplace are invaluable. In case you are a corporate citizen with access to an online library, do read this book. If you are building your own collection of useful books, then you must buy this one.

Kaggle for Analytics Competitions – Feedback?

Kaggle is a platform for data prediction competitions. As per their wikipedia entry “This crowdsourcing approach relies on the fact that there are countless strategies that can be applied to any predictive modelling task and it is impossible to know at the outset which technique or analyst will be most effective.”

I reviewed a few competitions on Kaggle, and they seem fairly complex and perhaps a good fit for advanced statisticians or data modelers. However, Kaggle is fairly popular and gets a decent amount of traffic for niche site.

  1. Does anyone have feedback on their personal experiences using Kaggle?
  2. Have you ever recruited or solicited candidates from Kaggle, for analytics roles in offshore development centers or for offshore analytics practices of IT/Analytics firms?
  3. Have you ever used it for networking?

Drop a comment on this post if you have tried any of the three.

Product Manager Maturity Model

Product Manager Maturity Model

There are several different career paths available for technology product managers, but in all of those, there are certain key skills that show how capable a person would be in any role. With job descriptions becoming more and more generic, it is up to you to understand what a role offers and what you might be able to deliver in that role. I will post more on this later.

Web Product Management and JavaScript

If you ask any product manager at a web firm if he does coding, he will respond with a firm “NO”. Then ask him what his work consists of, and he will explain about¬† use cases, features, experiments and other common responsibilities. At this point, you should ask him if he knows JavaScript and/or HTML and CSS. 90% of web product managers, whether in local market roles or offshore roles, will respond with a “YES”.

Today, it is almost mandatory for web product managers to have knowledge of web software development. And this knowledge is necessary not for software development, but for meaningful conversations about architecture, design and deliverables with the software team. [It helps a lot if you can speak their language!] One of the key components of this lingo is JavaScript, which is surprisingly easy to learn and fairly difficult to master.

In my opinion, JavaScript and Java and 2 programming paradigms similar to RISC and CISC microprocessor architectures. In earlier times, CISC dominated and it required a strong mastery over the instruction set, to construct good quality programs. Later, RISC (and parallel processing in multi-core microprocessors) made life easier for not-so-skilled programmers to churn out software. However, to build really good programs for RISC chips, you still need to learn a lot of “other” constructs apart from the chip’s instruction set. These other constructs are similar to the vast amount of libraries for JavaScript, which make life easier for a master programmer, but difficult for a product manager, if he wants to master coding. Even then, this is far simpler than the hundreds of patterns, libraries and classes that you will need to work on for many years to become a master at Java programming.

More formally, JavaScript is a client-side scripting language, which can be learnt quickly, and will definitely set you apart from the “non-techie” product managers. There are several tutorials that explain the syntax (Hello World!, decisions, loops etc) of JavaScript, and after that, it is just a matter of practising these learnings. Of course, you must have a basic knowledge of software development to fully “speak Javascript”.

So how does this help you as a product manager? As I mentioned before, it is useful in 3 scenarios:

1) Prototyping

No matter which prototyping tool you learn to use, a mockup will rarely be interactive unless you add JavaScript. HTML forms, pages and dialogs will become more clear than basic wireframes when you present the concept to the engineering team. This may even allow them to improve on your efforts during development.

2) Discussions

When your engineering team starts explaining¬† the benefits of designing “multi-threaded JavaScript objects” running parallelly versus a simple object pool, you should be very sceptical. And knowing JavaScript basics will allow you to research on the net why this could be a bad idea from a time, complexity and engineering resource point of view.

3) Career Development

While a JavaScript certification may never be a career changer, having JavaScript in your skill set, even with an MBA, will set you apart from the other product managers. It’s easy to learn, you can practice it on any laptop and use it practically when needed.

Apart from JavaScript, it is useful to learn HTML and CSS. And recently, there has been a lot of talk about “Big Data” technologies such as Hadoop, Hive, PIG etc. More on that in a later post.